Rail/Intermodal Roundtable: Full head of steam

The nation’s railroads have pulled out of the downturn in solid fiscal shape, proving that they’ve mastered the art of cost management. To offer a comprehensive look at the new state of the rails, we’ve gathered four top analysts to share how volumes, rates, and game-changing regulation could alter how shippers manage the mode.
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By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
October 08, 2010 - LM Editorial

While the recent recession has been declared the worst economic downturn in nearly a century, the nation’s freight railroads never missed a beat. In fact, they continued rolling on a bullish path, spending $21.8 billion of their own private capital in 2008 and $20.2 billion in 2009. As a consequence, the 140,000-mile rail network serving shippers has not only been maintained—it’s been modernized.

But now there’s a new worry in the shipping community: new regulatory laws. Opponents argue that unbalanced legislation will result in lower rates for some, while penalizing others. Add to this the concern that railroads will suddenly put a halt to new investment as a hedge against more unforeseen intervention.

To put the rail market into better perspective, we’ve gathered four leading analysts to share their perspectives and help rail shippers better understand how they’ll need to plan their rail and intermodal moves heading into 2011.

Check below for related articles.

2010 Mid-year rate outlook: Paying a Premium

2010 State of Logistics: Make your move



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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