Raymond donates historical equipment and memorabilia to New York state museums

Wood and cast metal cart offers glimpse into materials handling technology at the turn of the 20th century.
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By Modern Materials Handling Staff
September 25, 2013 - MMH Editorial

With a history dating back to 1840, The Raymond Corporation is donating several historical items and memorabilia for display in two New York state museums. Originally established as Lyon Iron Works in Greene, N.Y., the foundry was purchased by George Raymond Sr. in 1922, marking the beginning of The Raymond Corporation’s 91-year history in the material handling industry.

To commemorate this history, The Raymond Corporation will donate two pieces of cast metal and agricultural equipment from Lyon Iron Works to the Northeast Classic Car Museum in Norwich, N.Y., and to TechWorks! at the Center for Technology & Innovation in Binghamton, N.Y.

The Northeast Classic Car Museum will receive a turn-of-the-century Lyon Iron Works wheel cart, commonly used to transport heavy items around the company’s facility. The wheel cart will be a permanent installation in the museum’s historical exhibit showcasing companies that shaped industry in Chenango County.

TechWorks! at the Center for Technology & Innovation also will receive a Lyon Iron Works wheel cart. In addition, this museum will receive two original Lyon Iron Works building signs. 

“Raymond’s roots run deeper than our 91 years as a material handling company,” says Timothy Combs, executive vice president of sales and marketing for The Raymond Corporation. “We are proud of our long-running history in the material handling industry as well as our history in central New York state. We look forward to displaying some of the items that helped shape our company as well as the industry.”



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Article Topics

News · Materials Handling · Education · Raymond · All topics

About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

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