Reverse logistics key to Arrow’s enterprise

In an interview with SCMR, Omur Bagci, the company’s director of global solutions explained that they have been able to add significant value to customers’ bottom line through inventory optimization and returns management programs.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
March 14, 2011 - SCMR Editorial

When Arrow Electronics Inc. announced that reverse logistics would be a new area of concentration for its global supply chain last January, there were still some details to be addressed.

In an interview with SCMR, Omur Bagci, the company’s director of global solutions explained that they have been able to add significant value to customers’ bottom line through inventory optimization and returns management programs.

“Reverse logistics announced the launch of its full-service reverse supply chain business segment comprising three brands,” explained Bagci. “This comprises ‘Resolve,’ a RL service brand; ‘Intechra,’ a source for IT asset disposition and services; and ‘Converge,’ a provider of electronic components distribution services.”


According to Bagci, each unique service offering complements the supply chain services of Arrow Electronics, a Fortune 200 company within the technology marketplace. He said that ReSolve, Intechra and Converge are the foundation of strategic growth in the reverse supply chain industry.


“Most manufacturers approach reverse logistics with an immediate tactical plan,” he said. “We want to take it to higher long-term level for technology-driven companies.”


Arrow’s suite of reverse supply chain services include:


• Service Spares Management: Inventory optimization and risk management of service spares, using lean planning principles to deliver bottom-line serviceability and overall inventory reduction.
• Product Returns Management: Value recovery through comprehensive asset reallocation and the redeployment of materials back into the service supply chain.
• IT Asset Disposition: Global, secure and compliant end-of-life IT asset disposition services, including data erasure and disposal, recycling, and remarketing of systems and components.
• Electronic Component Distribution: Rapid electronic component distribution and demanding quality-control programs driven by comprehensive testing capabilities, integrated systems, market intelligence and a global footprint.


Bagci said that the global recession taught shippers “how to squeeze value out of the supply chain.”


“And now that things are improving this is a lesson that will not be forgotten,” he said.

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About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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