Rutgers professor receives IWLA distinguished service award

The International Warehouse Logistics Association recently presented its 2012 Distinguished Service Award to Dale S. Rogers, professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and co-director of the Center for Supply Chain Management at Rutgers University.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
March 30, 2012 - MMH Editorial

The International Warehouse Logistics Association recently presented its 2012 Distinguished Service Award to Dale S. Rogers, professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and co-director of the Center for Supply Chain Management at Rutgers University.

“Throughout his career Dale Rogers has contributed enormously to the progress and growth of the warehouse industry,” said IWLA Immediate Past Chairman Linda C. Hothem, president of Pacific American Group. Hothem presented Rogers with the award March 18 during the IWLA Convention & Expo in San Francisco.

Hothem cited Rogers’ contributions to the creation of the logistics industry’s first verification and education sustainability program as key among his service: “He gave his time and knowledge, free of charge, to help IWLA establish its Sustainable Logistics Initiative. He has dedicated much of his personal and professional life to researching how to environmentally improve logistics processes.”

In addition to his role at Rutgers, Rogers also is the leader in sustainability and reverse logistics practices for Instituto De Logistica E Supply Chain (ILOS), and its sustainable supply chain research project, in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.

For 20 years Rogers was the Foundation Professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and the director of the Center for Logistics Management at the University of Nevada, Reno. He also held the Paper Foundation Visiting Eminent Scholar Chair of Logistics at the University of North Florida.

He has consulted with many companies, including Kenco Logistics, Hewlett-Packard, Coca-Cola, IBM, UPS, Menlo Logistics, Genco Logistics, Sun Microsystems, Kmart, Maersk Logistics, and Unisys. Rogers also has been the principal investigator on research projects. Previously, while a professor at the University of Nevada, Rogers served as the director of customer service for the Non-Carbonated Beverages Division of Coca-Cola.

Widely published in logistics journals, Rogers is also the co-author of the recent books Supply Chain Management: Processes, Partnerships, Performance and Going Backwards: Reverse Logistics Trends and Practices.



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