New issues surface at SCOPE West

In an exclusive interview given to SCMR before this week’s “Supply Chain Operations Private Exposition, Barnes outlined what he sees as some of the key issues surfacing next year.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
August 28, 2010 - SCMR Editorial

The line is between 3PLs and non-asset based supply chain consulting firms, is blurring said Jim Barnes, CEO of enVista.

In an exclusive interview given to SCMR before this week’s “Supply Chain Operations Private Exposition” (SCOPE) West in Las Vegas, Barnes outlined what he sees as some of the key issues surfacing next year.

“Our customers are telling us that solutions must be customized to accommodate the complexity of new distribution patterns,“ he said. “Our recent work with Nature’s Best demonstrated that point pretty well.”

In that particular case, the client operated a “Home Grown” (IBM Mid-range AS/400) warehousing system across all distribution centers. However, the system took on two different forms: a third of the centers operated with a Reserve Inventory System combined with a Voice Selection System, and the remaining centers operated on a system where selection was done via labels, and inventory labels were limited to Primary Pick Slots. The client needed to determine if a Best- of-Breed Warehouse Management System (WMS) and/or Labor Management Systems (LMS) offered adequate base functionality to achieve a rapid and significant return on investment.

In his SCOPE presentation, “The Best Case: How Distributors Transform Their Supply Chain and Achieve Excellence,” Barnes will reference similar examples of value-added consulting services.

“SCOPE is an excellent forum for new ideas and concepts to be tested,” he said. “It provides a real opportunity for us to network and stay focused on this ever-changing business.”



About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Congested U.S. port terminals, harbor and over-the-road truck and driver shortages, slower trains and longer rail terminal dwell times due to increased domestic rates have not only disrupted service but also driven intermodal rates and cargo handling costs up sharply.

Southern California shippers are getting a break on container dwell expenses for the next ten days as the Port of Long Beach announced that it had added an extra three days to the time that overseas import containers can remain on the docks without charge.

The long-simmering court battle over whether FedEx Ground’s workers are independent contractors or employees appears headed to the appellate courts—and maybe the U.S. Supreme Court.

Carload volume headed up 4.3 percent to 298,376, and intermodal units, at 273,376 containers and trailers were up 4.8 percent annually.

In light on various service-related freight railroad service issues, the Department of Transportation’s Surface Transportation Board (STB) recently announced it is now requiring Class I railroads to publicly file weekly data reports on service performance. These weekly reports are slated to begin on October 22.

Article Topics

News · 3PL · Inventory · Supply Chain · Management · Labor · LMS · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.