Sealed Air and Ecovative expand relationship to produce and distribute mushroom packaging in Europe

Biomaterial technology produces sustainable packaging from mushroom roots.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
May 03, 2013 - MMH Editorial

Sealed Air Corporation and Ecovative Design have completed an agreement to expand their existing relationship in order to continue to accelerate the production, sales and distribution of Ecovative’s Mushroom Packaging in Europe. Sealed Air plans to begin offering the products in Europe immediately.

Last year, the two companies announced Sealed Air as the exclusive licensee for protective packaging in North America for Mushroom Packaging, a new technology for rapidly renewable and environmentally responsible packaging materials made from agricultural byproducts and mycelium, or mushroom roots. In October 2012, Sealed Air launched Restore Mushroom Packaging, its first commercialized product using Ecovative’s biomaterial technology.

“The agreement builds upon our successful, ground breaking relationship with Sealed Air and continues the overall momentum for providing an innovative and effective alternative to petrochemical based packaging on a much larger scale,” said Eben Bayer, CEO of Ecovative. “We are confident that we can extend this momentum into the European marketplace.”

“Ecovative has had a great deal of success using the unique properties of mycelium for protective packaging. We are looking forward to meeting the performance needs of potential European customers through a variety of packaging applications using this technology,” said Ryan Flanagan, president of Sealed Air’s Protective Packaging business.

Details of the transaction were not disclosed.

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About the Author

Josh Bond, Senior Editor
Josh Bond is Senior Editor for Modern, and was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and associate editor. He has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce University.


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