Security Experts Maintain Advanced Technology Can Deter Terrorists

By SCMR Staff
April 19, 2013 - SCMR Editorial

According Amy Zuckerman, president of A-Z International Associates, here are the most commonly used tracking technologies by the military and transportation world. She added that they are easy to procure and cost-effective.

• Every bank and many buildings are secured after hours. People can enter with a card that contains bar codes embedded in magnetic strips.

• What about something as simple as body scans for people entering a specified area. When I attended a presidential rally recently no one got inside without submitting to a scan. It did not hurt or slow down entry very much. It simply helped detect weapons.

• Transponders—those white boxes you affix to your windshield—allow motorists to pass through toll booths on roads, bridges and tunnels at almost highway speeds. Strategically-placed readers pick up the dedicated short-range (DSRC) radio signals that ship encrypted financial data so motorists do not have to stop and pay

• Then there are sensors and lasers that when combined are used to create perimeters. Cross the laser beam and you get hit by military or police in minutes. In fact, this is routine technology for military use.

• Container shippers have utilized electronic seals, called eseals, for at least 13 years. Nowadays, the seal is affixed inside the door. It contains a sensor and the capability of sending radio signals out to security personnel using satellite, cell and DSRC so there is almost no time that they are out of signal range.

• Trucking firms can attach tracking technology that creates what is called a geofence so that any time a driver gets out of range the dispatcher alerts him or her by wireless communication. No response and the police are there ASAP.

• Advanced video cameras are in place at many seaports that track movement without humans needing to be present. Any movement out of the norm that the cameras detect sends out a warning.

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson


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