Six Questions to Ask About Cloud Computing

Cloud computing—an emerging technology that gives users wide access to computing capabilities without the costs of ownership—has huge potential for the supply chain. In fact, the cloud is poised to usher in a new era of high-performance SCM. But before making the transition to cloud computing, companies need to address six key questions to make sure that they capitalize on its full potential.
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May 02, 2011 - SCMR Editorial
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Around the world, interest in cloud computing is growing rapidly, as executives in more and more industries identify ways to capitalize on the benefits it promises. Many organizations are now using cloud services and technology to develop innovative products, improve operations, share information with customers, partners and suppliers, and run important enterprise applications. Despite security concerns and other challenges, executives in virtually all sectors believe cloud computing can provide their companies with lasting competitive advantage.

Over time, the cloud revolution will reach every area of business activity, reflecting the benefits it offers in terms of costs, scalability and flexibility. Not surprisingly, interest in cloud’s potential in supply chain management is increasing apace, as companies worldwide strive to make their supply chains more flexible, dynamic and efficient in response to ever-increasing volatility in customer demands and market conditions.

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