Solution pairs RFID-embedded pallets with AGVs

iGPS and Egemin Automation announced a partnership of their technologies.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
March 21, 2011 - MMH Editorial

iGPS and Egemin Automation announced a partnership of their technologies in a press conference held yesterday at iGPS’s booth (Booth 4531).

The solution combines iGPS pallets, embedded with RFID technology plus proprietary software, with Egemin’s automatic guided vehicles (AGVs) and RFID readers. This enables the AGVs to scan and track each load during transport. The data captured is automatically transmitted to the facility’s WMS, eliminating load blind spots within a warehouse. 

Currently in use at the facilities of four manufacturers, the combined solutions provide a high level of load visibility, said Tom Kaminski, director of products and sales for Egemin.

The goal is to expand the technology throughout North America and into Europe within the next three years and explore opportunities in automotive parts and pharmaceutical verticals.

“Replacing traditional load-handling methodologies, including wood pallets and standard forklifts, with this automated system gives users a much higher level of supply chain knowledge and visibility than was achievable in the past,” said John Ledwith, director of sales for iGPS.

ProMat 2011 will be held March 21 - 24, 2011 at McCormick Place South in Chicago. The tradeshow will showcase the latest manufacturing, distribution and supply chain solutions in the material handling and logistics industry.

Read all of Modern’s ProMat 2011 coverage

 

 



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