Steve Simonson joins Fortna as vice president of sales

Simonson brings 24 years of experience in developing strategic supply chain strategies, distribution designs and operations management.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
February 06, 2014 - MMH Editorial

Fortna, the professional services and engineering firm, has announced that Steve Simonson has joined the firm as vice president, sales, reporting to Andrew Breckenridge.

Simonson, a supply chain industry veteran, will work closely with Fortna’s North American sales team to build relationships with both existing and new strategic accounts.

Simonson comes to Fortna from Tompkins International, where he was a partner in the Supply Chain Consulting Group for 14 years. Over his 24 year career, Simonson has demonstrated leadership in selling and developing strategic supply chain strategies, distribution designs, complex software and material handling equipment implementations, and operations management.

“I am thrilled to be part of the Fortna team. I was drawn to Fortna’s vision, the types of complex distribution challenges Fortna solves, and their integrated approach that allows them to be fully accountable to real business results,” said Simonson. “I have a strong passion for quality and for open, honest and frequent communication, and I look forward to getting to know Fortna’s clients.”

“I am delighted to have such an accomplished industry veteran join our team,” stated Andrew Breckenridge, executive vice president of Fortna. “Steve’s knowledge and deep industry experience will add value and strengthen our already solid commitment to delivering results for our clients.”



Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

According to the report, this option will be made available in 14 metropolitan locales in the United States and will not come with an extra fee for Amazon Prime members.

DHL said this investment is being made to meet customer needs for ongoing growth in international e-commerce and global trade and will also provide more gates to accommodate additional aircraft, warehouse space, and new equipment to provide more capacity for sorting shipments and for unloading and reloading planes.

The Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) reported this week that U.S. trade with its North America Free Trade Agreement partners Canada and Mexico in March dropped 5.3 percent annually to $96.1 billion.

U.S. carloads were down 9.1 percent annually at 273,387, and intermodal volume was up 4.3 percent annually at 281,090 containers and trailers.

NRF's Jonathan Gold explains that the past year was replete with disruptions, slowdowns and partial shutdown, which can no longer be the norm, saying ports and dockworkers must adapt to ensure they provide shippers with the predictability and stability they need.

About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.