Supply Chain Managers Can Justify Risk Avoidance Investments

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
October 10, 2013 - SCMR Editorial

How do you put a value on avoiding a problem that seemingly no longer exists because you’ve already spent money on eliminating it?
This is the classic Catch-22 dilemma faced by many corporate security managers when trying to justify further investments in steeling the supply chain against disruptions.

It’s a vexing problem, but there are ways around it, says Yossi Sheffi, MIT Elisha Gray II Professor of Engineering Systems, Director MIT CTL.

Read more here



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at [email protected]

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