Supply Chain Managers May Welcome New Ocean Container Trend

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
August 20, 2013 - SCMR Editorial

According to analysts with Drewry Maritime Resarch ocean cargo container lines are still being squeezed out of providing “home-grown” integrated logistics services.

This is evidenced by Maersk’s news last week that it has entered into an agreement to sell the assets of its U.S. trucking subsidiary Bridge Terminal Transport, analysts add.

“Although partly driven by financial necessity, the ocean carrier trend appears to recognize that one-stop shops are not the way forward,” said Drewry. “That expansion via vertical integration should be replaced by greater focus on the provision of core services.”
This is implicit in Maersk’s statement, which reads:

“The Group’s strategy is to build on its strong presence in shipping, energy and related activities. We have been pleased with the business levels, the profitability and the quality of management at BTT. It is, however, a provider of drayage services that does not fit in our long-term strategic focus [any longer]. The sale will allow the Group to reallocate resources to the strategic focus areas within shipping, energy and related activities.”

Meanwhile, may supply chain managers expect ocean carriage to become more sustainable? More on that next time.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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