Supply Chain Managers Rank Ocean Cargo Carriers

All Annual Survey responses are aggregated, and the individual responses discarded, to assure confidentiality of each shipper’s response.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
June 18, 2013 - SCMR Editorial

The results of the AgTC’s 2013 Ocean Carrier Performance Survey were announced late last week at the 25th Annual Meeting of the Agriculture Transportation Coalition in San Francisco, with APL winning top ranking. 

All Annual Survey responses are aggregated, and the individual responses discarded, to assure confidentiality of each shipper’s response.

This year’s Survey was expanded to gain more insight into agriculture and forest products shippers who completed the Survey. The Survey collected data on the shippers’:

-  Cargo origins in the US and Canada
-  Global cargo destinations
-  Volume of cargo/containers shipped each year
-  Special equipment and handling requirements
-  Mode of transport (truck, rail, barge) used to access the departure ports

The AgTC members were then asked to rate ocean carriers in eleven categories of service. Following are the categories and the two highest ranked carriers in each category. (The full results showing the entire rankings may be shared with individual carriers, upon request)

• Most consistent availability of correct sizes and types of container equipment needed
◦ APL
◦ OOCL

• Most consistent availability of slots on vessels and equipment needed each week by port and service string
◦ Hapag-Lloyd
◦ Hanjin Shipping

• Best overall document accuracy and efficiency
◦ OOCL
◦ Yang Ming
• Most accuracy in shipment rating and bill of lading release/turn time
◦ OOCL
◦ APL

• Most willing to accept shippers’ export documentation as close to cargo cut-off as possible
◦ APL
◦ OOCL
• Best vessel schedules and transit days
◦ Hamburg Sud & ‘K’ Line (tied)
◦ APL

• Best intermodal door service and availability from shipper facilities or interior gateways
◦ ‘K’ Line
◦ APL

• Best terminal service and efficiency at US ports
◦ APL
◦ Yang Ming & Evergreen (tied)

• Best terminal service and efficiency at foreign ports
◦ ‘K’ Line
◦ Hamburg Sud

• Carrier that understands and attempts to adapt to commercial needs of the agriculture community
◦ U.S. Lines
◦ Yang Ming

• Best representatives’ response time and ability to address problems
◦ OOCL
◦ U.S. Lines

Peter Friedmann, Executive Director Agriculture Transportation Coalition told SCMR last year that carriers were expected to be less tactical and more strategic in 2013:

“Instead of looking just to the next quarter, ocean carriers would do well to follow the railroads’ model of looking five years out to the future, to better understand the agriculture exporters’ business, the global demand for their products, global competition for their exports, and thus, have a better idea of the long term demand for capacity.”

 



About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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