Talent Development: a Litmus Test

Talent Development is one important component of Talent Management, a vitally important subject for any organization aspiring to achieve the "next level."
By Robert A. Rudzki, SCMR Contributing Blogger
July 05, 2011 - SCMR Editorial

How serious are you – as a leader or manager - about Talent Development? Talent Development is one important component of Talent Management, a vitally important subject for any organization aspiring to achieve the “next level.” The subject of this week’s post is specifically Talent Development.

What might a litmus test look like for Talent Development? How would you demonstrate that you are serious about it?

A litmus test would include the following points:

1. Has the company’s strategy and objectives been translated into the required skills and competencies for the supply management organization?

2. Have the current skills and competencies been assessed relative to the required skills and competencies? Are the gaps well understood (for the department overall, and for each person)?

3. Has a curriculum of development opportunities being created and made available to all personnel?

4. Has a financial budget been established to support the training and development plans?

5. Has a time budget been established (i.e. the company will support a minimum of 40 hours training per person per year)?

6. Beyond the classroom training, has a budget been established to provide on-the-job SME advisors and coaches for your personnel (to facilitate effective knowledge transfer)?

7. Has a career ladder been established and communicated?

8. As part of the annual goal setting discussion with all employees, is there a written personal development plan established for each employee that the company supports and funds?

A comprehensive review of the subject of Talent Management appears in Chapter 6 of the just-released new book Next Level Supply Management Excellence: Your Straight to the Bottom Line Roadmap (Rudzki, Trent).

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About the Author

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Robert A. Rudzki
SCMR Contributing Blogger
Robert A. Rudzki is a former Fortune 500 Senior Vice President & Chief Procurement Officer, who is now President of Greybeard Advisors LLC, a leading provider of advisory services for procurement transformation, strategic sourcing, and supply chain management. Bob is also the author of several leading business books including the supply management best-seller "Straight to the Bottom Line®", its highly-endorsed sequel "Next Level Supply Management Excellence," and the leadership book "Beat the Odds: Avoid Corporate Death & Build a Resilient Enterprise." You can reach him through his firm's website: http://www.GreybeardAdvisors.com

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