Technology Outlook: 2010 and Beyond

As Director of Supply Chain Management for ARC Advisory Group, Steve Banker keeps a watchful eye on emerging developments in the supply chain space. It’s a task he is well familiar with; Banker has been covering supply chain, logistics and warehousing management for ARC since 1996—making him one of the most senior analysts in the business.
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By SCMR Staff
January 07, 2011 - SCMR Editorial
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As Director of Supply Chain Management for ARC Advisory Group, Steve Banker keeps a watchful eye on emerging developments in the supply chain space.  It’s a task he is well familiar with; Banker has been covering supply chain, logistics and warehousing management for ARC since 1996—making him one of the most senior analysts in the business. “Essentially, I grew up with the industry,” he says.

Tracking supply chain technology is a big part of Banker’s job at ARC, a leading research and analysis firm that focuses on manufacturing, logistics and the supply chain.  Banker covers the subject from multiple aspects—the vendors, the users, the technology itself and the market.  As for the market, as Banker relates in our interview, things have not been especially upbeat for several years now; there’s simply been no growth.  Banker sees another year of the same before things start to turn around when a gradual recovery begins in 2011.

But just because the market is down, Banker says, that doesn’t mean supply chain practitioners cannot benefit from the new technology that’s available as well as some exciting new applications now starting to emerge. Two in particular that he singled out are demand signal repositories and robotic materials handling.

Banker’s insights and observations on technology should help supply chain managers be better prepared for whatever the coming year holds in store. SCMR Editorial Director Francis J. Quinn conducted this interview.

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