The leadership imperative

By Robert A. Rudzki, SCMR Contributing Blogger
June 16, 2011 - SCMR Editorial

A lot has been written over the years regarding the subject of leadership. I won’t review the material here other than to say there are lots of good references, including “The Leadership Challenge” by Kouzes and Posner, as well as chapter 6 of my book “Beat the Odds: Avoid Corporate Death and Build a Resilient Enterprise.”

The purpose of this posting is to highlight one fundamental, distinguishing characteristic of successful leaders.

This subject came to mind recently during a conversation I was having with a client of our firm. During the course of that conversation, which touched on a variety of subjects including leadership and management, an old chart came to mind. In fact, the origins of that chart pre-date PowerPoint, to give you some perspective. The chart succinctly summarizes what we all know implicitly, but too often forget.

The message is simple, and stands on its own without the need for further commentary:

Visions are good. Objectives are good. Strategies and plans are good. Teams are good. Studies are good. Consensus is good.

Skills and competencies are very good. Thinking is also very good.

But, only DOING the right things adds value.

For related articles click here.


About the Author

Robert A. Rudzki
SCMR Contributing Blogger
Robert A. Rudzki is a former Fortune 500 Senior Vice President & Chief Procurement Officer, who is now President of Greybeard Advisors LLC, a leading provider of advisory services for procurement transformation, strategic sourcing, and supply chain management. Bob is also the author of several leading business books including the supply management best-seller "Straight to the Bottom Line®", its highly-endorsed sequel "Next Level Supply Management Excellence," and the leadership book "Beat the Odds: Avoid Corporate Death & Build a Resilient Enterprise." You can reach him through his firm's website:

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