The Look and Feel of Our Products In the Future

Supply Chain professionals may already be familiar with the global marketplace and the different ways of operating around the world of business. Now we have to add Asian preferences in every aspect of our lives
By Rosemary Coates, President of Blue Silk Consulting
November 23, 2012 - SCMR Editorial

As China goes through its industrial revolution, there is a startling expansion of the middle class. The Chinese middle class is expected to grow from 350 million to 800 million within 10 years.  Across Asia, people are earning more and have more disposable income.  Demand for products such as consumer electronics, cosmetics, fashion brands, cars and homes is burgeoning.

So how will this change the look and feel of products in the future?  Things like the user interface on consumer electronics will be driven by Asian tastes and preferences, not American tastes.  Your iPod, smart phone, TV controls and cars will reflect what the Asian market demands.  Products that used to be designed for Western tastes and then localized for the Asian market will now be designed for Asia and localized for Americans.

Westerners will no longer drive the standards for products, education and even the smallest things like color and taste preferences will change.  You know that minty toothpaste you use every morning?  You may have an option to buy green tea flavor or herbal paste in the future.  That Barbie doll you bought for your daughter for Christmas is likely to have fewer curves in the future to address Asian ideals of beauty.  Taste and preference for products will be Asia-driven.

Supply Chain professionals may already be familiar with the global marketplace and the different ways of operating around the world of business. Now we have to add Asian preferences in every aspect of our lives.

This is the China Century.



About the Author

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Rosemary Coates
President of Blue Silk Consulting
Ms. Coates is the President of Blue Silk Consulting, a Global Supply Chain consulting firm and the author of: 42 Rules for Sourcing and Manufacturing in China. (an amazon.com Top Seller) and 42 Rules for Superior Field Service. Ms. Coates lives in Silicon Valley and has worked with over 80 clients worldwide. She is also an Expert Witness for legal cases involving global supply chain matters.

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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