“Transportation’s Role in the Global Supply Chain” Features Noted Author

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
September 24, 2012 - SCMR Editorial

Most executives today readily acknowledge the critical value of supply chains. A sobering truth, however, is that thousands of U.S. companies never even consider supply chain strategies when creating business plans—even though they account for roughly 60 percent of a firm’s total costs, 100 percent of the inventory, and are essential to providing the customer service required to drive sales.

This shocking fact is at the heart of J. Paul Dittmann’s latest book, Supply Chain Transformation. This essential volume provides guidelines and suggestions for creating and maintaining a customized supply chain system that drives revenue, maximizes profitability, improves efficiency, and increases shareholder value. Dr. Dittmann, Executive Director of the Global Supply Chain Institute at the University of Tennessee, and a frequent contributor to SCMR is among the panelists today’s webcast, “Transportation’s Role in the Global Supply Chain.”

Supply Chain Transformation: Building and Executing an Integrated Supply Chain Strategy, is Published by McGraw Hill, and will be available next month.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Article Topics

Blogs · Global · Supply Chain · Transportation · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at [email protected]

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