Two Major International Firms Partner to Measure Supply Chain Carbon Management

FCS, an early player in the discipline of environmental sustainability, and CDP, an international not-for-profit organization that works with the world’s largest investors and corporations to motivate companies and cities to disclose their impacts on the environment and take action to reduce them, have been working together since 2011.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
June 26, 2013 - SCMR Editorial

First Carbon Solutions, (FCS) and CDP have announced their expanded partnership to increase services that measure supply chain carbon management and extend sustainability scoring to CDP’s climate change program in the Nordic and Benelux regions, Australia, New Zealand and India. 

FCS, an early player in the discipline of environmental sustainability, and CDP, an international not-for-profit organization that works with the world’s largest investors and corporations to motivate companies and cities to disclose their impacts on the environment and take action to reduce them, have been working together since 2011.

As the exclusive scoring partner of CDP’s supply chain program, FCS reviews and scores thousands of responses provided by participating suppliers. Leveraging its proven sustainability reporting systems and data management and carbon accounting expertise, FCS has built a system based on CDP’s global methodology to evaluate and score CDP responses in a standardized way.

These scores allow the 65 members of CDP’s supply chain program including multinationals like Unilever, The Coca-Cola Company, and Walmart – to benchmark environmental performance, examine practices and develop year-on-year performance improvements.

In an interview with SCMR, Robert A. Francisco, President of FCS said , FCS and CDP are working together to help suppliers enhance customer relationships, better manage risk, increase ROI, and improve their reputations as good global citizens.

“Expanding our relationship to more suppliers and new geographies also provides wider visibility and transparency for stakeholders and investors around the world to make more informed decisions,” he added.

As part of the expanded relationship, FCS will also score submissions from major companies in the Nordic and Benelux regions, as well as in Australia, New Zealand and India on their climate change performance. The scored submissions, from several hundred of the largest companies including Qantas Airways, Ahlstrom Corporation, Tata Chemicals, Skanska AB and Bang & Olufsen, will be delivered to the 722 investors that request this vital climate data via CDP. These scores will also be delivered to the markets via financial data providers including Bloomberg and Google Finance to inform business, investment and policy decisions.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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