Universal Robots to significantly expand production capacity

Opening of new headquarters marks a sevenfold increase of company premises.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
May 02, 2014 - MMH Editorial

Universal Robots, the Danish manufacturer of industrial robots, has celebrated the opening of its new company headquarters in Odense, Denmark.

Moving into new facilities will extend production capacity as the company aims for turnover of one billion Danish kroner by 2017 ($185 million), a tenfold increase compared to the company’s 2013 revenue.

Ever since the first UR robot hit the market in December 2008, the production has doubled annually, reaching the limits of the company’s old production facilities. Totaling 12,000 square meters, the new headquarters will be seven times bigger than the former headquarters.

“Our new premises allow us to increase daily production to more than 150 robots,” said Enrico Krog Iversen, CEO of Universal Robots. “This expansion of production capacity is urgently needed, as we plan to sell 2,000 robots in 2014. Furthermore, we plan to keep doubling our sales every year from 2014 to 2017.”

The company’s lightweight robots began in 2008 as a university research project starting out with five employees, a number which has now grown to a staff of more than 110. Aside from production facilities and sales offices, the new facility also includes the Universal Robots Advanced Training Center.

“Denmark is and always will be our robot-stronghold. With the planned increase in production, we will be able to create approximately 200 new jobs at Universal Robots,” Iversen said. “This will lead to further growth at the suppliers and dealers we collaborate with, so that our expansion might lead to indirectly creating another 300 new jobs in the Odense region.”



Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Seasonally-adjusted (SA) for-hire truck tonnage in July headed up 1.3 percent on the heels of a 0.8 percent increase in June. The ATA’s not seasonally-adjusted (NSA) index, which represents the change in tonnage actually hauled by fleets before any seasonal adjustment, was 133.3 in July, which outpaced June’s 132.3 by 0.8 percent, and was up 2.8 percent annually.

Volumes for the month of July at the Port of Long Beach (POLB) and the Port of Los Angeles (POLA) were mixed, according to data recently issued by the ports. Unlike May and June, which saw higher than usual seasonal volumes, due to the West Coast port labor situation, July was down as retailers had completed filling inventories for back-to-school shopping.

With a 0.8 cent decrease, this week’s average price per gallon is $3.835 and stands as the lowest price since hitting $3.844 the week of November 25, 2013.

LTL carriers are rapidly investing in expensive, on-dock, three-dimensional size measurement capturing machinery, and they are hoping one day of being able to more accurately charge shippers rates based on the actual dimensions of their shipments, rather than the traditional weight-and-distance-based formula that has been in effect since the 1930s or even earlier.

The Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) recently reported that its Freight Transportation Services Index (TSI) dipped 0.9 percent from May to June.

About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.