UPS survey: Healthcare supply chain shippers continue to adapt to industry challenges

Sixth annual UPS “Pain in the (Supply) Chain” healthcare survey outlines concerns among decision makers and how they plan to address them, such as the 70% who plan to implement new distribution channels over the next five years.
By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
September 17, 2013 - MMH Editorial

The sixth annual UPS “Pain in the (Supply) Chain” healthcare survey, conducted for UPS by TNS, a provider of global market research services, was based on data and feedback from more than 440 senior-level healthcare supply chain decision makers in North America, Asia-Pacific, and Western Europe. Regardless of their location, all cited healthcare legislation and procedures as top concerns.

In order to grow business in the face of these challenges, respondents report that over the next five years, 84% plan to invest in new technologies, 78% plan to enter new markets, 70% plan to implement new distribution channels to providers, retailers, and end-patients, and 59% plan to count more on 3PL partners.

To read about more highlights from the report in Logistics Management, click here.



About the Author

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Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff joined the Supply Chain Group in 2005 and leads online and print news operations for these publications. In 2009, Jeff led Logistics Management to the Silver Medal of Folio’s Eddie Awards in the Best B2B Transportation/Travel Website category. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. If you want to contact Jeff with a news tip or idea,
please send an e-mail to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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