UPS survey: High-tech shippers face a changing logistics landscape

Emerging markets are key targets of new initiatives, even as the number of executives considering near-shoring has tripled.
By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
November 20, 2013 - MMH Editorial

It is not a secret that high-tech supply chains are among the most fluid and complicated as they are faced with myriad challenges in getting their goods from production to purchase. These challenges and ways in which high-tech logistics executives address them were front and center in the fourth annual global UPS Change in the (Supply) Chain survey released today by UPS.

The survey was conducted by IDC Manufacturing Insights and its findings were based on feedback from roughly 350 high-tech logistics executives in North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia.

In the survey, various aspects of the high-tech supply chain, including a global high-tech outlook, near-shoring, and the customer-centric supply chain, among others. The underlying theme of the survey had to do with driving change in the “chain”, with high-tech logistics executives preparing for gear-shifts to remain competitive and stay ahead in a tight market.

Click here to read the full story on the Logistics Management website.

About the Author

Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff joined the Supply Chain Group in 2005 and leads online and print news operations for these publications. In 2009, Jeff led Logistics Management to the Silver Medal of Folio’s Eddie Awards in the Best B2B Transportation/Travel Website category. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. If you want to contact Jeff with a news tip or idea,
please send an e-mail to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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