What Supply Chain Topics Matter Most to You?

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By Francis J. Quinn, Editorial Director
August 27, 2010 - SCMR Editorial

It’s that time of year for us in the publishing business to start putting together our editorial calendars for 2011. This is an inexact science at best because while we think we have a good handle on what readers are interested in today, it’s hard to project with certainty that those same topics will still be “hot” a year from now.

But we do our best, relying on past experience and on proven sources in the consulting, analyst and industry association communities. So what are we looking to cover in 2011 in the pages of Supply Chain Management Review?

One main area of concentration will be professional development—specifically, topics like educational opportunities, talent recruitment and retention, and career skills needed to advance. We plan to continue to run our popular supplements on supply chain course listing two times a year. We’ll also be adding some special features on available educational opportunities—both in the traditional and in the virtual classroom.

As in past years, software and technology will capture a significant share of the spotlight in 2011. We plan to place particular emphasis on demand management and inventory optimization. Recent reports from some of the top supply chain analyst firms indicate that these types of applications will be in great demand going forward as companies seek to control inventory costs without jeopardizing product availability. The plan is to not only inform readers about what’s available in these areas, but also show practical examples of the technology at work.

Global supply management will be high on our coverage list, too. Readers tell us they are looking for insights and guidance on how to make more effective sourcing decisions. They also want practical advice on how to put together an efficient global network that balances cost, quality, and service considerations. Finally, we intend to devote space to specific challenges such as achieving better visibility over shipments and synchronizing the flow of goods and finance in the global supply chain.

Finally, in the coming year expect to find a good representation of what we call (for want of a better term) “back to basics” articles.  Yes, we recognize that many of our readers have deep and broad experience in supply chain management. But our readership scores tell us that even the most experienced practitioners from time to time appreciate a re-grounding in the basics of transportation management, warehousing, procurement principles, and so forth. And, of course, the newcomers to the supply chain space welcome the “basics” articles.

So that’s a snapshot of our thinking with regard to the subjects we’ll cover in 2011.  If you have an idea or suggestion on what you would like to see in SCMR, let us know by either commenting on this blog or contacting me directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).



About the Author

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Francis J. Quinn
Editorial Director
Frank Quinn is the editorial director of Supply Chain Management Review, considered the premier publication for supply chain executives. Frank was the founding editor SCMR and has overseen its growth over the past 14 years. He has been covering the logistics/supply chain scene in various editorial and consulting positions for more than three decade. Frank is co-author of the recently published book Diagnosing Greatness: Ten Traits of the Best Supply Chains. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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