Will neighbor to the north seize supply chain advantage?

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
October 24, 2010 - SCMR Editorial

While the long-term viability of U.S. West Coast ports is being called into question lately, Canada’s two leading Pacific Rim ocean cargo gateways are thriving.

To date, the Port of Vancouver in British Columbia had an overall tonnage increase mid-year of 20 per cent. The port’s container, breakbulk and bulk traffic totalled 58.4 million tons in the first half of 2010. Neighboring Port of Prince Rupert, meanwhile, has sailed safely through the receding global economic storm, recording its highest volume throughput since 1997. The port handled 12,173,672 tons of cargo in 2009, up 15 per cent over 2008 volumes.

Significantly, the higher volumes in 2009 were not driven by one line of business, but were up for most Prince Rupert facilities including containers and bulk cargo.

More telling information on shipper satisfaction (or dissatisfaction) will be available shortly. The Port Performance Research Network, chaired at Dalhousie University, is working diligently on gathering feedback, and we look forward to sharing its findings with our readers.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Article Topics

Blogs · Global · Ocean · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at [email protected]

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