Yale Materials Handling works with Seegrid to provide AGV functionality

Yale customers to have opportunity to deploy vision-guided, driverless vehicles.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
March 14, 2014 - MMH Editorial

Yale Materials Handling Corporation has announced that by working with Seegrid, a leading provider of vision-guided flexible automated guided vehicles (AGVs), “Guided by Seegrid” technology will soon be available to Yale customers.

The “Guided by Seegrid” technology will allow Yale customers to deploy Seegrid’s vision-guided, driverless automation solution in their materials handling applications. No additional infrastructure for navigation, such as wires, laser targets or magnetic tape, is required to operate these products.

“Our customers have materials handling challenges, and we’re looking to provide solutions that deliver efficiency to their business,” said Brett Schemerhorn, vice president of marketing for Yale. “Seegrid is the recognized industry leader for vision-guided technology, and the ‘Guided by Seegrid’ technology will enhance efficiency and productivity for our customers’ day-to-day needs.”

Anthony Horbal, CEO of Seegrid said, “This is an important relationship for two strong companies with recognized brands. Seegrid delivers innovative and proven vision-guided navigation technology and with Yale’s sales and service networks and loyal brand customers, the ‘Guided by Seegrid’ technology is poised for extraordinary success.”

The driverless technology can help offset labor and operating costs and allow employees to be redeployed to value-added roles. The automated transportation of materials might also help improve facility productivity.



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About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

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