ATA and AAR put up united front for passage of House transportation bill

Organizations join together to urge Members to oppose any floor amendments that would modify any of the truck size and weight provisions in the bill.

By ·

In an effort to move along a new surface transportation reauthorization, two of the largest and most influential freight transportation industry associations—the American Trucking Associations (ATA) and the Association of American Railroads (AAR) issued a joint statement calling for the passing of H.R. 7, the American Energy and Infrastructure Jobs Act, with an emphasis on truck productivity, a five-year, $260 billion bill.

While the ATA and AAR have been at odds over the years for issues relating to truck size and weight, which was initially part of H.R. 7, the bill initially called for a measure to increase truck weights from 80,000 to 97,000 pounds on interstate highways at the discretion of states that want to have them. This provision was focused on raising the weight limit to 88,000 pounds for car carriers and 97,000 pounds for six-axle trucks.

But soon after the bill was introduced, the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee voted against this provision by a 33-22 measure and drafted an amendment that requires the United States Department of Transportation to conduct a comprehensive three-year study of the safety and pavement performance of the widespread use of bigger trucks, according to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.

“[A]s the U.S. House of Representatives prepares for floor consideration of H.R. 7…the Association of American Railroads and the American Trucking Associations join together to urge Members to oppose any floor amendments that would modify any of the truck size and weight provisions in the bill that was reported out of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee on February 3,” said Edward Hamberger, AAR president and CEO, and Bill Graves, AR President & CEO, in the joint statement.

They added that that the long-term reauthorization of the nation’s critical surface transportation programs is necessary and long overdue, explaining the passage of H.R. 7 by the House is an important step in the process of reaching an agreement of a long-term, fully funder surface transportation bill.

ATA Vice President of Communications and Press Secretary Sean McNally told LM that while the ATA and AAR had their difference over truck size and weight provisions while the bill was being marked up by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, both groups acknowledge there are a lot of good things regarding productivity in the bill.

“This is taking one potentially controversial item off the table as the House tries to pass the bill and move to the Senate, then move to conference and into a final piece of legislation that gets signed into law,” said McNally. “Outside of the truck productivity issue there is a lot we are happy to see in not just the House bill also the Senate bill [MAP-21]. With regard to the productivity issue in the House, we are disappointed that the vote went the way it did, but in the interest of getting a bill that is now 30 months past due, let’s all pull on the rope in the same direction.”

McNally said there are still differences that need to be worked out so the sooner they are addressed, will lead to benefits for all transportation users.

Backers of increased truck weights say it would result in fewer trucks on the highways, less pollution, reduced emissions, bolster productivity and perhaps save as much as 2 billion gallons in diesel annually. And those with an opposing view maintain that longer and heavier trucks are not the answer to operational improvements and congestion reduction.

 

 


About the Author

Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. Contact Jeff Berman

Subscribe to Logistics Management Magazine!

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Latest Whitepaper
How Lean is your Lean Quality Program?
Avoid quality program bureaucracy that can sap logistics productivity and increase costs
Download Today!
From the September 2016 Issue
Indecision revolving around three complex supply chain elements—transportation, technology and organizational structure—finds many companies waiting to commit to a strategic path. However, waiting too long will only result in a competitive disadvantage that will be difficult to overcome in today’s fast-paced, global economy.
Time for Asia’s ports to rebuild
Is the freight recession upon us…again?
View More From this Issue
Subscribe to Our Email Newsletter
Sign up today to receive our FREE, weekly email newsletter!
Latest Webcast
Supply Chain Best Practices: Visibility to In-Transit Inventory
During this webcast you'll learn on how various organizations have gained instant access to in-transit parcels and given access to this information to stakeholders.
Register Today!
EDITORS' PICKS
25th Annual Masters of Logistics
Indecision revolving around three complex supply chain elements—transportation, technology and...
2016 Quest for Quality: Winners Take the Spotlight
Which carriers, third-party logistics providers and U.S. ports have crossed the service-excellence...

Regional ports concentrate on growth and connectivity
With the Panama Canal expansion complete, ocean cargo gateways in the Caribbean are investing to...
Digital Reality Check
Just how close are we to the ideal digital supply network? Not as close as we might like to think....