DHL focuses on helping SME’s be more competitive on a global level

With an eye on helping United States-based small and medium-sized enterprises (SME’s) be better equipped to conduct business on a global level, express delivery and logistics services provider DHL recently announced it is offering various services to SME’s meet the challenges of international trade and commerce.

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With an eye on helping United States-based small and medium-sized enterprises (SME’s) be better equipped to conduct business on a global level, express delivery and logistics services provider DHL recently announced it is offering various services to SME’s meet the challenges of international trade and commerce.

Among these offerings are networking events, online resources, and an expanded U.S. operational network to help SME’s leverage DHLs global reach and experience.

In late July, DHL partnered with Inc. magazine for its Business Across Borders event series, which it said provides SME owners and executives with information on conducting business globally. At these events, DHL and SME executives participate in panel discussions, as well as networking sessions to learn and gain expertise.

Christine Nashick, VP of Marketing at DHL Express U.S. told LM there were multiple reasons for DHL’s decision to launch this initiative.

“Given the complexities of shipping across borders, SME’s need some extra attention and resources to help them break into global markets and understand how to do business on a global scale,” said Nashick. “Most of our larger customers have dedicated shipping departments with experienced personnel who deal with international regulatory matters on a daily basis.  Many SME’s just don’t have the luxury of those resources. As specialists in international, DHL can act as the extension of an SME’s shipping department.” 

While DHL has been serving SME’s for years, this effort started in the fourth quarter of 2009 when it did most of its planning to ensure it put the Web resources in place and aligned with its partners.

The SME-focused Web site, entitled DHLsmallbusiness.com, is comprised of online tools, reference guides, and special offers for SMEs. DHL said it also serves as a small database for sharing knowledge, best practices, and other SME-related topics.

“The dedicated small business portal and website is a great resource,” said Nashick. “In addition, the networking events we developed in partnership with Inc. offer a solid platform for SME’s to learn from others who have navigated globally with success.  SME’s can network with international experts at DHL, our own customers, and various industry experts at these events. With Inc. at the forefront of entrepreneurship and DHL as a specialist in international, it is a perfect partnership for us to develop a platform together to help SME’s grow and prosper on an international scale.

And at the panel discussion in New York in July, Nashick said that managing growth, issues about intellectual property rights and labor issues were among the topics addressed. She added that the Business Across Borders event series that DHL is hosting in partnership with Inc. is directed to SMEs and involves 14 sessions across the U.S. from now through mid-October, with an average of 150 guests per event.


About the Author

Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. Contact Jeff Berman

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