Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Diesel prices fall for fifth straight week, reports EIA

By Staff
October 18, 2013

The average price per gallon of diesel gasoline fell for the fifth straight week, the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA) said this week.

Falling 1.1 cents to $3.886 per gallon, this most recent drop follows declines of 2.2 cents, 3 cents, 2.5 cents, and 0.7 cents over the previous four weeks and is the longest stretch of declines since falling for six straight weeks earlier this year from May 27 through July 1.

In its recent update of the short-term energy outlook, the EIA expects the average price of diesel for 2013 to be $3.96 per gallon, just ahead of 2012’s $3.97. For 2014, it expects the average price to be 3.76 per gallon.

The recent decline in prices is not entirely surprising, given record high refining in the U.S., shrinking consumer demand and slumping crude oil prices, Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst for Internet website price tracker GasBuddy.com, said in a USA Today report.

Regardless of the fluctuation in diesel prices, shippers are cognizant of the impact diesel prices can have on their bottom line—for better or worse.

And they continue to be proactive on that front, too, by taking steps to reduce mileage and transit lengths when possible as well as cut down on empty miles. And even through shippers want to adjust budgets in order to offset the increased costs higher fuel prices bring, it is not always an easy thing to manage.

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The tired cliché of “Perfect Storm,” is probably lost on East Coast shippers now weathering fierce winter winds and snow, but the expression still has currency on the Pacific Rim.

Owners of corporate fleets and fuel buyers face two dilemmas: a limited supply of cost-effective, low greenhouse-gas fuels, and little information on fuel sustainability impacts across the full production and use value chain.

U.S. Carloads were up 5 percent annually at 294,738, and intermodal at 253,317 containers and trailers was up 3 percent.

When it comes to Congress actually getting its act together on a new long-term federal transportation bill, things remain as status quo as it gets, with the big takeaway being nothing really ever gets done, when it comes to passing a badly overdue and needed bill, rather than these band-aid extensions Congress keeps signing off on.

Truckload and intermodal pricing was up on an annual basis, according to the December edition of the Truckload and Intermodal Cost Indexes from Cass Information Systems and Avondale Partners.

Article Topics

News · EIA · Diesel Prices · Diesel · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA