Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


IANA reports “surge” in domestic container volumes

IANA said that domestic intermodal’s strong pace was bolstered by a steep rise in diesel prices that likely made it more cost-effective for shippers to shift freight off the highway.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
August 10, 2011

A report issued by Intermodal Association of North America this week shows that domestic and international intermodal volumes posted solid gains in Q2 2011.

IANA’s “Intermodal Market Trends & Statistics Report” noted that domestic container volume grew 9.0 percent year-over-year – a stronger pace than during the previous two individual quarters. This rate of increase is especially impressive considering that the highest gain recorded (16.4 percent) was posted in Q2 2010.

Although domestic containers recorded significant increases, trailer volumes had more modest gains, rising 4.6 percent over 2010 levels – a slightly slower pace than in the previous quarters that likely represents a continued equipment shift toward domestic containers.

IANA said that domestic intermodal’s strong pace was bolstered by a steep rise in diesel prices that likely made it more cost-effective for shippers to shift freight off the highway.

Donald Pisano, chairman of the National Industrial Transportation League’s Ocean Transportation Committee, and chairman of the Traffic and Warehouse Committee at the Green Coffee Association, told LM that the trend to move cargo via intermodal is growing.

For a variety of reasons, this is gaining traction, he said.

As with other industry leaders, he also said it will have an impact on which seaports prosper in the future.

International intermodal volumes during the quarter increased 5.4 percent year-over-year. While this is the slowest rate of international growth since late 2009, IANA noted that previous quarters benefited from weak comparisons. International shipments also would likely have been higher were it not for the disasters in Japan that reduced the volume of Japanese imports, said IANA.

While the rate of intermodal growth slowed from the first quarter to the second quarter, it still remains in-line with many industry analyst estimates of 6-8 percent year-over-year expansion, said IANA spokesmen.

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Even as Congress was putting the finishing touches on a 10-month short-term funding extension to the federal aid highway bill that temporarily averts a funding crisis, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx was ripping the measure as a short-term “gimmick” that once again fails to adequately fund U.S. infrastructure needs in the long run.

ISI is comprised of Integrated Services, ISI Logistics and ISI Logistics South and is focused on the warehousing and transportation needs of automotive shippers. RRTS said that in 2013, Integrated Services generated revenues of approximately $21 million adding that Integrated Services is expected to be accretive to Roadrunner’s earnings in 2014.

The market for supply chain management software continues to expand, highlighting the importance of software in today’s supply chains.

Over the past five years emerging markets have maintained their “growth dynamic,” observes John Manners-Bell, CEO, of the London-based think tank Transport Intelligence (Ti).

Amid the talk and coverage about things negatively impacting the trucking industry like increasing regulations, tight capacity, and equipment-related issues and challenges, there is one thing to always remember about the sector: it moves a lot of freight, make that more than a lot, actually.

Article Topics

News · 3PL · Trucking · Railroad · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA