Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Panjiva data shows a sequential slowdown in global trade

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
June 15, 2012

On the heels of two strong months of global trade activity, data released by Panjiva, an online search engine with detailed information on global suppliers and manufacturers, showed a bit of a slowdown from April to May.

U.S.-bound waterborne shipments, which were up 14 and 11 percent, respectively, in the previous two months, dipped 2 percent from April to May at 1,061,192. May shipments were up 2 percent annually. 

Panjva reported a 0.4 percent increase in the number of global manufacturers shipping to the U.S., with May coming in at 148,861. On an annual basis, the number of manufacturers shipping to the U.S. inched up 1 percent. May’s number was in line with recent months, including April’s 148,246, March’s 136,286 and January and February at 145,520 and 128,244, respectively.

“It would have been great to see the growth streak continue,” said Panjiva CEO Josh Green in an interview. “But this data is coming off of a couple of really strong months, and the basis for comparison is quite high, and we are still running ahead of where we were last year. The news is certainly not as good as we would like, but I don’t see anything in the data that suggests we are heading for a significant slowdown.”

Looking ahead, Green said it is possible that the next couple of months could be flat in terms of growth and then start to ramp up again in August, which could likely end up being the peak month of the year for global trade activity. What is happening now-with this current batch of data-could be viewed as a “dip” prior to the build-up to the holiday season, he said.

If declines or flat trade numbers persist into the summer months, Green said that may be viewed as a sign that retailers are pessimistic about the holiday season. Green noted that as things currently stand, typical seasonal trade patterns are intact heading into the second half of the year.

Looking at April to May gains in recent years, the rate of growth for the same time period this year was down. For April to May U.S.-bound shipments, 2011 was up 8 percent, 2010 was up 12 percent, and 2009 and 2008 were up 2 and 3 percent, respectively.  And for manufacturers, 2011 was up 6 percent, 2010 was up 9 percent, and 2009 and 2008 were up 2 and 3 percent, respectively.

“When looking at sequential comparisons, you need to be a little careful,” said Green. “One strong month makes the next month look weak in comparison. April was an extraordinarily strong month and now in comparison May does not look so good, but May 2012 is better than May 2011 and that closely matches how things are economically, with things being a little better this year.”

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Seasonally-adjusted (SA) for-hire truck tonnage in November was up 3.5 percent compared to October, which was up 0.5 percent over September at 136.8 (2000=100), marking the highest SA on record.

UPS said that through this acquisition it will augment its healthcare expertise and network in Europe, specifically in the fast growing healthcare markets in Central and Eastern Europe.

Carloads were up 12.1 percent at 312,271, and intermodal at 280,337 containers and trailers saw a 4.5 percent annual gain.

Total November POLB volumes were up 2.1 percent year-over-year at 581,514 TEU, and POLA volumes in November decreased 3 percent compared to November 2013 at 663,346 TEU.

When railroads are doing business with a larger than large customer like UPS, it stands to reason, it can often be the best, and worst, of both worlds, depending on how things are going. That was one of the main takeaways from a presentation by UPS Vice President of Corporate Transportation Services Ken Buenker at this year’s RailTrends conference in New York.

Article Topics

News · Global Trade · Panjiva · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA