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Security technology: Closing the vulnerability gap

Successful integration of technology into a supply chain security strategy will expedite border crossing wait times and reduce insurance costs. Fortunately, new technologies continue to be introduced that provide greater transparency at some of the critical junctures where security needs and vulnerability overlap.
By Suzanne Richer, President, Customs & Trade Solutions, Inc.
October 08, 2010

Securing the international supply chain continues to be a major challenge for global corporations.

The last decade has seen the development of cargo security programs from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) C-TPAT program to the European AEO program and similar global initiatives. These well-intended global programs seek to add transparency to the international movement of goods, tying in the sharing of electronic data between governments to improve risk assessment and ultimately to reduce the possibility of tampering between the loading of the product at origin and the arrival into the receiving country.

Many of these programs take a common approach to securing the international supply chain by focusing on key components of internal controls—from the ordering process all the way through to the distribution of goods. However, most of the activity between these two points is outsourced to business partners who then become responsible for the safety and security of the freight while it’s in their possession.

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About the Author

Suzanne Richer
President, Customs & Trade Solutions, Inc.

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Article Topics

Features · Supply Chain · Security · All topics

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