Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Supply Chain Virtual Conference Has Back to Basics Theme

By Francis J. Quinn, Editorial Director
August 06, 2010

Our reader surveys tell us that everyone likes articles and information that stress the basics of supply chain management. Not surprisingly, it’s certainly true for individuals just entering the field or transferring to the supply chain space from some other part of the organization. More surprising, however, is that even the most seasoned supply chain executives like to revisit the basics—procurement, order fulfillment, transportation management, warehousing, and so on—from time to time.

That’s why Supply Chain Management Review and our sister publication Logistics Management put together a “Virtual Conference” on the subject. It’s called Supply Chain Fundamentals: The Building Blocks of Success. This event comes complete with keynotes, workshop sessions, and exhibitor booths that you can attend in the comfort of your home or office or airport lounge—or any other place you have access to a computer.
The Virtual Conference is on demand and you can access it any time of day or night.  Simply go the registration page at http://www.scmr.com/fundamentals  (And., don’t worry, there’s no charge.)

The conference features four educational workshops that focus on key components of the supply chain process—namely, sourcing/procurement, transportation, warehousing, and reverse logistics.  Each session includes an expert panel that explains the basic principles of executing these core processes and benefits to be realized for doing so effectively.

The SCMR/LM Virtual Conference also features a keynote presentation by logistics pioneer Ken Ackerman as well as a number of booths you can visit on the show floor.  It’s well worth the virtual trip.

About the Author

image
Francis J. Quinn
Editorial Director

Francis J. Quinn currently serves in the dual capacity of editorial director of Supply Chain Management Review and Editor-at-Large of Logistics Management. Frank has been covering the transportation and logistics scene for close to two decades, having served for many years as editor of Traffic Management Magazine. He also has written a special supplement on logistics for Business Week and was a principal contributor to the book Supply Chain Directions for a New North America, prepared for the Council of Logistics Management by Andersen Consulting. Frank holds an undergraduate degree from Boston College and a masters degree from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. His service experience in the U.S. Army includes tours of duty as a magazine editor in Washington D.C. and a military intelligence officer in Saigon, Vietnam.


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Of special interest to readers of Logistics Management will be “Americas Update,” which will look into the future of the market in the Americas and assess how firms will be able to favorably position themselves to compete and win market share.

After 20 years, two congressional mandates and countless lawsuits and lobbying efforts, safety advocates and the Teamsters union still say there are too many inexperienced rookie truck drivers hitting the road without sufficient behind-the-wheel training.

Congested U.S. port terminals, harbor and over-the-road truck and driver shortages, slower trains and longer rail terminal dwell times due to increased domestic rates have not only disrupted service but also driven intermodal rates and cargo handling costs up sharply.

Southern California shippers are getting a break on container dwell expenses for the next ten days as the Port of Long Beach announced that it had added an extra three days to the time that overseas import containers can remain on the docks without charge.

The long-simmering court battle over whether FedEx Ground’s workers are independent contractors or employees appears headed to the appellate courts—and maybe the U.S. Supreme Court.

Article Topics

News · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA