Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!

U.S. is defaulting on credibility, but supply chain hangs tough

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
July 25, 2011

Sick of the talk and double-talk about the debt limit talks going on in Washington? Personally speaking, it is definitely starting to wear on me a little bit.

Seriously, look at the ongoing menu of rhetoric coming at us on this whether it is on TV, the Web or whatever that is filled with terms like: “signs of progress,” “baby steps,” “cautiously optimistic a deal will get done,” “both parties are coming up with separate plans” or “Wall Street is coming up with a backup plan” (gee, I feel better now-grin).

Isn’t it fair to say we have all been dealt a very tough hand in recent years—at least back to 2007 anyhow? In that time alone, we have seen enough negative things occur, that wondering when things will even come close to getting back to normal—whatever that may be—seems truly futile at times.

But regardless of the cards we are holding, we all have to make do with what we have got and look hard for a silver lining, no matter how hard it is to find at times like these.

To see the antics on display regarding the debt limit at the moment really makes the entire country look bad no matter which side you are on.

Looking at what could happen should the U.S. not be able to, you know, pay its bills is particularly difficult to contemplate, too. After all, it is not like the financial crisis of 2008 was that long ago.

We saw what that contributed to and caused and, as you know, it was not a pretty picture. Some of those after-effects are still playing out in the logistics and transport sectors on a daily basis, whether it is tight credit availability, constrained budgets, murky outlooks, or any other number of things.

But as has been the case in the past when a crisis arrives, it is hard to not see how these sectors are prepared and ready to adjust to a situation.

The business of moving freight, regardless of mode or locale, requires agility, speed, and smarts. During the time I have covered this space, it is easy to observe I have seen these things at work on myriad occasions.

These things can be seen in the form of taking a clear and defined path to sustainable supply chain practices (although there are many more steps to go), smart inventory planning, and route optimization and leveraging best practices where and when it matters most, among many others.

While economic uncertainty is everywhere, we all need to keep our eye on the ball. Even if our elected leaders in Washington are having a hard time connecting, it is clear that supply chain managers and logistics leaders are adjusting to difficult conditions and staying on base.

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Kurt Nagle, president and CEO of the American Association of Port Authorities recently voiced his endorsement of this trade legislation

While many auto executives expect more industry recalls in 2015 and 2016, just 8 percent use advanced predictive analytics to help prevent, prepare for, and manage recalls, according to a recent online poll from Deloitte.

Purolator white paper highlights common Canadian shipping mistakes. From failing to appreciate the complexity of the customs clearance process to not realizing that Canada recognizes both French and English as its official languages, U.S. businesses frequently misjudge the complexity of shipping to the Canadian market. This often results in mistakes - mistakes that can come with hefty penalties and border clearance delays, and that can result in lingering negative perceptions among Canadian consumers.

At a certain point, it seems like the ongoing truck driver shortage cannot get any worse, right? Well, think again, because of myriad reasons we could well be in the very early innings of a game that is, and continues, to be hard to watch. That was made clear in a report issued by the American Trucking Associations (ATA), entitled “Truck Driver Analysis 2015.”

Coming off of 2014, which in many ways is viewed as a banner year for freight, it appears that some tailwinds have firmly kicked in, as 2015 enters its official homestretch, according to Rosalyn Wilson, senior business analyst at Parsons, and author of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) Annual State of Logistics (SOL) Report at last week’s CSCMP Annual Conference in San Diego. The SOL report is sponsored by Penske Logistics.


Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.

© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA