Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


UPS announces planned acquisition of TNT Express is officially withdrawn

Lack of clearance from European Commission halts UPS' plans for significant European expansion
By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
January 30, 2013

UPS announced today that its planned acquisition of Netherlands-based TNT Express, a subsidiary of TNT-NV and a provider of mail and courier services and the fourth largest global parcel operator for roughly $6.8 billion is officially off.

This announcement follows a formal decision from the European Commission, the executive body of the European Union, which prohibited the acquisition. UPS officials said that as a result of the prohibition by the EC, the deal will not be completed, and UPS and TNT have entered a separate agreement to terminate the merger protocol.

Many of the EC’s concerns over the deal were due to the competitive parcel landscape in Europe, according to UPS. And while UPS said it proposed “significant and tangible remedies” to address these concerns—including a plan to sell some of its assets, together with some TNT assets, to DPD, a parcel-delivery firm controlled by French state-owned postal group La Poste, which could have created a new pan-European overnight-parcel delivery competitor, or integrator, according to a Wall Street Journal report—it did not pass the EC’s litmus test.

“UPS believes that the combined company would have been transformative for the logistics industry, bringing meaningful benefits to consumers and customers around the world, while supporting much needed growth in Europe in particular,” it said. “While UPS is disappointed in the EC’s decision, the company’s focus is on the continued execution of its growth strategy.”

Since March 2012, when UPS and Netherlands-based TNT, said they reached an agreement in which UPS would acquire TNT Express, the deal has seen more that its share of stops and starts for various reasons.

UPS said in December that the EC had told both UPS and TNT Express that “it is working on a decision to prohibit the proposed acquisition of TNT Express.”

“We are extremely disappointed with the EC’s position,” said Scott Davis, UPS Chairman and CEO, at the time. “We proposed significant and tangible remedies designed to address the EC’s concerns with the transaction. The combined company would have been transformative for the logistics industry, bringing meaningful benefits to consumers and customers around the world, while supporting growth in Europe in particular.”

The EC’s decision followed a series of competition-related obstacles coming from the EC and the European Union, going back the last several months, including:
-a November filing by the European Commission, which cited the European Union (EU) Competition Commissioner as saying UPS needs to offer “substantial remedies” to eliminate concerns of the deal which would double its size in Europe;
- multiple extensions of the Offer Period for the deal and a Statement of Objections (SO) put forth in late October by the European Commission (the SO addresses the competitive effects of the intended merger on the international express small package market in Europe”); and
-a Bloomberg report which said UPS received antitrust objections from regulators which listed potential problems with the deal, including how buying TNT would remove one of the few serious competitors in the European delivery services market.

A November Wall Street Journal report indicated pointed out that given the antitrust concerns over this deal, UPS was separately working on several possible remedies as the November 29 deadline to offer concessions got closer. Among the concessions, according to the report, was UPS’s U.S. group shrinking its existing presence in the international parcel delivery sector of Europe, where there are the most serious objections to the deal.

Stifel Nicolaus analyst David Ross wrote in a research note that the EC and UPS/TNT appear to differ on the size of the parcel market, which Stifel believes is the “main basis for objection to this merger.”

UPS said that upon prohibition by the EC, the Offer Condition relating to the EU Competition Clearance will not be fulfilled and UPS will pay TNT a termination fee of $267 million and withdraw the offer.

When the proposed deal was first announced last year, UPS and TNT envisioned myriad joint synergies, including:
-the complementary strengths of both organizations creating a customer-focused global platform that would be a leader in transportation technology and customer service;
-TNT Express customers benefiting from UPS’s unparalleled access to the North American market as well as access to its logistics solutions, such as global freight forwarding and distribution capabilities; and
-UPS customers benefiting from access to expanded express and road freight capabilities in Europe and broader capabilities in fast-growing regions such as Asia-Pacific and Latin America.

Over the years, TNT has grown into a highly respected $7.25 billion euro company with diverse revenue streams from around the world with operations in more than 200 countries in Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific and Latin America, said UPS CFO Kurt Kuehn on a March 2012 investor call. And he added TNT has a substantial group of assets, including aircraft, vehicles, hubs, and depots, which cumulatively account for about 1 million deliveries per day handled by its 77,000 employees. In 2011, TNT had a net loss of $270 million euro and $7.2 billion euro in revenue.

TNT officials said that TNT Express’ Executive Board and Supervisory Board recognize that the merger process has been a distraction for management, adding that management will focus on reassuring customers of TNT Express’ commitment to providing industry-leading services; ensuring engagement and commitment of employees; and strengthening its strategy, including further steps to improve profitability.

“Based on the maneuverings of TNT to configure the firm for an acceptable acquisition and the length of time all this has taken I believe that the EU may now have dealt TNT a death sentence,” said Jerry Hempstead, president of parcel consultancy Hempstead Consulting. “Because of all the uncertainty the customers made moves and many employees lost focus and energy. You will see this in the next quarterly report. Now TNT has to rebuild and I’m not certain the $200 million will be enough to save them in the long run. I’m not convinced the EU understand that their may be unintended consequences to this action.”

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The PMI, the ISM’s index to measure growth, increased 1.8 percent to 57.1 in July. This is 1.8 percent higher than the 12-month average of 55.3. The PMI has grown in 18 of the last 20 months, with economic activity in the manufacturing sector expanding for the last 14 months as the overall economy was up for the 62nd consecutive month.

YRC Worldwide, whose regional and long-haul units provide the second-largest LTL capacity in the trucking industry, narrowed its second-quarter loss to $4.9 million on $1.32 billion revenue, compared with $15.1 million loss on $1.24 billion revenue in the year-ago quarter.

With NFL training camps in full swing, it stands to reason that Congress must be replete with football fans, given how it basically has elected to punt on federal transportation funding yet again, with the Senate yesterday signing off on a ten-month bill to keep federal surface transportation funding intact through May 2015 through a nearly $11 billion stopgap measure.

Carload volumes were up 4.3 percent at 306,988, and intermodal volume for the week ending July 26 was up 3.3 percent at 264,809

Article Topics

News · Global Logistics · UPS · TNT NV · TNT · TNT Express · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA