DOT makes good on promise to seaports

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
December 15, 2011 - LM Editorial

As noted in our news section, there are several deserving projects directly related to seaports included in TIGER III awards.

• South Jersey Port Rail Improvements for $18,500,000 to repair the DelAir Bridge, linking the rail networks of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This major connection will be repaired to accommodate the transport of industry-standard 286,000-pound rail cars and enhance freight movement throughout the Northeast region. It is part of a larger effort to repair the rail network from the DelAir Bridge to the Port of Salem, including the ports of Paulsboro and Camden, which must be significantly upgraded to accommodate the anticipated increased demand in rail and port traffic.

• Port of Long Beach Rail Realignment for $17,000,000 to improve the lead tracks to two Port of Long Beach rail yards and relieve a chokepoint at the Ocean Boulevard overcrossing, where a large portion of the cargo transits enters or exits port property. The project will improve efficiency and reduce the environmental impact of freight movements, and create jobs, enabling the port to move 35 percent of goods via on-dock rail by 2035.

• Port of New Orleans Rail Yard Improvements for $16,738,246 to rebuild a specialized Port of New Orleans rail yard at the Louisiana Avenue terminal along the Mississippi River. The overall project has two components: construction of a new 12-acre freight rail intermodal terminal; and resurfacing and fortifying a 4-acre storage yard that is used for ultra-heavy project cargoes.  The project’s objective is to reduce congestion, facilitate the movement of marine and rail cargo, stimulate international commerce and maintain an essential port asset in a state of good repair.

• Dames Point Intermodal Container Facility for $10,000,000 to help complete a new Intermodal Container Transfer Facility (ICTF) at the Port of Jacksonville that will be used by CSX railroad. The ICTF will include a five-track rail yard, two wide-span electric cranes and a paved area for stacking containers and several support uses, including a road and gate for truck movement of cargo, a parking area and storm-water retention facilities.

In addition to those mentioned above, there are a number of TIGER III awarded projects that address key congestion points along main rail lines, inland port facilities and highway trade corridors. These will also have a positive impact on freight mobility and the movement of goods to and from America’s seaports.?



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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