Flux Power’s advanced lithium battery packs approved for use in Toyota and Raymond lift trucks

Both new and old class III walkies to benefit from the emerging technology.
By Josh Bond, Associate Editor
February 12, 2014 - MMH Editorial

Flux Power Holdings, an innovator in advanced lithium energy storage systems, has received approval to sell its lithium battery solution for Toyota and Raymond “walkie” lift trucks.

Following an extensive testing process, the Flux LiFT-24V-TRW battery pack was approved for use in Toyota and Raymond Class III lift trucks, both for new trucks and as a replacement option for existing trucks. Toyota is the world’s number one selling lift truck manufacturer, selling under both the Toyota and Raymond brands in the U.S.

“Toyota and Raymond are leaders in researching and commercializing new technologies to improve power and performance in the electric lift truck market,” said Ron Dutt, Flux Power CEO, in a recent interview. “This approval represents a significant step for Flux in achieving industry acceptance and expanding awareness for a battery pack that will benefit customers through lower operational costs and improved fleet efficiencies.”

According to Dutt, lithium-ion battery packs have a much lower total cost of ownership (TCO) as compared to traditional lead-acid batteries. Lithium-ion batteries require no watering or other maintenance, can be opportunity-charged at any state of charge and will fully recharge in as few as two hours but no more than seven hours for the largest packs. Although the batteries come at a much higher initial cost than lead-acid alternatives, their significantly longer life span is a major contributor to their lower TCO. Dutt also confirmed that each battery comes with a five-year warranty – the average lifespan of a walkie lift truck.

Dutt said that the Toyota testing and approval process does not substantiate Flux Power’s product marketing claims, but does confirm functionality and compatibility. Certain models of Toyota and Raymond walkies will sport stickers indicating the units are compatible with Flux LiFT-24V-TRW lithium-ion packs and will not compromise a warranty.

“Flux lithium batteries, as compared with lead acid batteries, last longer between charging and deliver a higher sustained performance level,” said Dutt. “Our solution addresses customers’ pressing need for longer runtime. We’ve found that the initial adopters are the purchasing managers of larger fleets who are very sensitive to total cost of ownership compared those who are focused only on acquisition price. It’s a very compelling option for them, and we think the balance of the market will move to taking that sort of longer term view.”



About the Author

image
Josh Bond
Associate Editor

Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce.


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

When railroads are doing business with a larger than large customer like UPS, it stands to reason, it can often be the best, and worst, of both worlds, depending on how things are going. That was one of the main takeaways from a presentation by UPS Vice President of Corporate Transportation Services Ken Buenker at this year’s RailTrends conference in New York.

While many market conditions are working against shippers, the most recent edition of the Shippers Condition Index (SCI) from freight transportation consultancy FTR shows that things may be improving, albeit slowly.

Newsroom Notes takes a look at some of the biggest stories and themes in logistics for 2014.

Even though China’s costs have risen and the U.S. has now surpassed Mexico as the preferred locale for relocating offshored manufacturing, advantages can be fleeting and the challenges great

Memphis-based FedEx reported solid fiscal second quarter earnings results today. Quarterly net income of $616 million was up 23 percent annually, and revenue, at $11.9 billion, was up 5 percent. Operating income at $1.01 billion was up 22 percent.

About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.