Global Port Tracker report points to flat growth amid difficult circumstances

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
October 26, 2011 - LM Editorial

Growth prospects in Northern Europe remain stalled, according to the most recent edition of the Global Port Tracker Report from Hackett Associates and the Bremen Institute of Shipping Economics and Logistics.

Ports surveyed in this report include the six major container reports in North Europe: le Havre, Antwerp, Zeebrugge, Rotterdam, Bremen/Bremerhaven, and Hamburg.

The report stated that total container volumes at these ports were estimated to have decreased by 0.9 percent in August from July to 3.42 million TEU (Twenty-foot equivalent Units), with August up 4.5 percent year-over-year and 8.5 percent year-to-date through August—and year-to-date imports and exports up 10.1 percent and 7.6 percent, respectively. And on a sequential basis, the 1.98 million TEU imported into Europe and the 1.48 million TEU exported out of Europe were down 0.6 percent and 3.2 percent, respectively, from July.

For the calendar year 2011, the report’s authors are calling for total import growth to be up 7.3 percent, with imports into North Europe to be up 8.9 percent. Despite this projection, total growth, according to the report, is forecasted in one of the next six months, and annual growth is anticipated in four of these months, with double-digit growth expected in three of them.

These projections come against the backdrop of a very difficult financial situation in Europe, which includes the financial crisis in Greece, and the Eurozone meeting being held this week among leaders of European nations to help resolve the European debt crisis.

“It does not look like at this point the Eurozone meeting is going to solve the existing problems as there is too much disagreement,” said Ben Hackett, president of Hackett Associates. “Without an agreement, it spells a major crisis for the Euro and will probably leave Greece hanging out on its own, with Spain and Italy not far behind. It will be make or break for Greece with the Euro not far behind.”

What’s more, the potential impact on global trade due to these circumstances could be devastating, said Hackett, as it could cause a financial crisis as the banks try to avoid losing huge sums of money on Greece and loans, coupled with consumers cutting back on non-essential purchases altogether.

Given this tenuous situation, Hackett explained that the numbers in August, despite the many issues occurring at the moment, are a testament to how well Europe is holding up compared to North America, with solid year-to-date numbers for international trade.

“The fourth quarter, though, is showing some weakness so far compared to previous quarters,” said Hackett. “Growth in Europe has been pretty flat since July, with some seasonal weakness in effect.”



About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The PMI, the ISM’s index to measure growth, fell 1.4 percent to 51.5 (a PMI of 50 or greater represents growth), declining for the fifth straight month since reaching 57.9 in October 2014. And it is 4 percent below the 12-month average of 55.5. The March PMI is at its lowest level since May 2013’s 50.1.

How the food giants integrate supply chain operations is one of the most interesting components of the recently-announced merger between H.J. Heinz Co. and The Kraft Foods Group.

The new online offering is entitled “Vessels at a Glance” and is comprised of a daily update that shows all vessels at berth and anchor within POLB, as well as the Port of Los Angeles (POLA). It also includes information relating to vessel arrival and departure dates and length of stay in Long Beach, too, along with weekly updated charts that show the number of vessels at anchor at POLB and POLA that POLB officials said illustrate trends occurring over the last six months.

The Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) reported this week that U.S. trade with its North America Free Trade Agreement partners Canada and Mexico in January dropped 1.2 percent to $89.3 billion.

Download our new white paper, "The ABCs of HST: Understanding the Harmonized System of Tariffs," for insights and explanations of the complex cross-border classification codes.

About the Author

Jeff Berman, News Editor
Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. Contact Jeff Berman.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA