Ocean Cargo: Continued emphasis placed on exports

The Port of Oakland is the major U.S. West Coast outbound ocean cargo gateway for export
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
July 19, 2011 - LM Editorial

Just when U.S. exports are ramping up, comes news that the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) and the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration (ITA) have signed a Memorandum of Intent (MOI) at the Port of Oakland. 

The Port of Oakland is the major U.S. West Coast outbound ocean cargo gateway for exports.

“Adjusting for inflation, California’s export trade is as robust as it was prior to the recession,”  Jock O’Connell, Beacon Economics’ International Trade Adviser told LM.

This finding harmonizes with that of the AAPA:

“AAPA and the Department of Commerce share a strong interest and commitment to increasing trading opportunities for U.S. products abroad,” said Kurt Nagle, AAPA president and CEO.  “We believe a collaborative approach between Commerce and America’s seaports is the best way to ensure the success of this important national initiative.”

This MOI implementing the “Partnership with America’s Seaports to Further the National Export Initiative” supports President Obama’s goal of doubling exports announced during his State of the Union speech in 2010.  Under the agreement, ITA and AAPA will partner to coordinate communications, idea exchanges, activities and services that assist U.S. businesses in exporting; and to increase awareness of the available services, trade missions, programs and overseas events that involve U.S. export opportunities.

Signatories to the MOI include Francisco J. Sánchez, Under Secretary, International Trade Administration, United States Department of Commerce and AAPA President and CEO Kurt Nagle.

Nagle emphasized that achieving the President’s goal requires both helping our exporters and improving our transportation infrastructure.

“As recognized by the Export Promotion Cabinet in their report to the President on the NEI, we must improve our transportation infrastructure to fully realize the potential gains from the NEI and to sustain U.S. international competitiveness,” said Nagle.  “This partnership and investments infrastructure will pave the way towards a prosperous future for all Americans.”



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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