Omni-channel logistics models drive demand for space

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
February 05, 2014 - LM Editorial

A staggering 40 percent of big-box industrial requirements are correlated to e-commerce; a sector growing globally by 20 percent each year.

As retailers develop new real estate models to support their omni-channel logistics models, they are looking at six primary types of warehouse space, ranging from mega-distribution centers to smaller delivery centers in urban areas. 

In 2014, Jones LangLasalle expects to see demand for urban logistics centers to support same-day package delivery.

Read more in Supply Chain Management Review



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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