Automation product: Printer-applicator prints, encodes and applies RFID labels

The model 5300rfid label printer-applicator prints, encodes, verifies and applies pressure-sensitive RFID smart labels to cartons and pallet loads in one automatic operation.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
October 26, 2010 - MMH Editorial

The model 5300rfid label printer-applicator prints, encodes, verifies and applies pressure-sensitive RFID smart labels to cartons and pallet loads in one automatic operation. As the label is printed, the integrated encoder simultaneously transfers digital information to the ultra-high frequency (UHF) transponder embedded in the pressure-sensitive label material. If the system determines that a tag is unverifiable, it rejects the label prior to application. The printer includes thermal/thermal-transfer print-encode engines to produce imprints with text, bar codes and graphics at 203 or 300 dpi. Depending upon the print engine, labels can measure up to 5 x 6 inches and output at speeds up to 12 inches per second. Weber Marking Systems, 847-364-8500, www.webermarking.com.



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About the Author

Bob Heaney is a seasoned professional with over 25 years of distinguished leadership experience in research, analysis, and advisory roles in Supply Chain Engineering. Heaney’s coverage area within Aberdeen includes various elements of Supply Chain Execution (Transportation Management, Warehouse Management, Distributed Order Management and Supply Chain Visibility). Contact Bob Heaney

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