Putting the “clean trucks” acrimony behind us

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
February 22, 2012 - LM Editorial

The ongoing conflict between the Port of Los Angeles and the American Trucking Association may be finally drawing to a close.

Now that The 9th Circuit, on appeal, struck down the port’s concession requirement banning owner-operator truckers from the harbor, the only issue that remains is whether four of the other concession requirements in the port’s “clean truck” plan will be upheld.

These include proof of financial responsibility; requirements on off-street parking; placards; and truck maintenance.

The Port of Los Angeles has filed its brief in opposition to the American Tucking Associations’ petition for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court.  The port’s brief focuses on the fact that Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision, affirming the District Court’s ruling upholding four Port Concession provisions, is consistent with existing case law and poses no conflict with either other federal circuit courts or the U.S. Supreme Court’s rulings.

Whatever the outcome, we look forward to putting this episode behind us. The port is booming again, providing jobs and new business in the region. It’s time to focus on the positive now and get on with the primary function of the nation’s leading ocean cargo gateway: moving freight.

 



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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Article Topics

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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