Trimble introduces Apple iOS support in latest release of ThingMagic Mercury API

The latest enhancements to the Mercury API address the growing demand from end users who want to use consumer mobile devices--smartphones and tablets--as an alternative to handheld computers for RFID applications.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
July 11, 2014 - MMH Editorial

Trimble announced today the addition of Apple iOS compatibility enhancements to the ThingMagic Mercury API software development kit. The latest enhancements to the Mercury API address the growing demand from end users who want to use consumer mobile devices—smartphones and tablets—as an alternative to handheld computers for RFID applications. The addition of iOS support represents the next step in expanding the breadth of application uses for ThingMagic’s Mercury API, an extensive software development kit that offers a consistent programmatic interface across all ThingMagic finished and embedded reader products.

“Feedback from RFID end users has shown an increased demand to use the most popular mobile devices and operating systems. We first responded with Android support in the last release of our Mercury API and have now added iOS support,” said Tom Grant, general manager of ThingMagic. “By adding iOS support to the Mercury API we are expanding the population of devices that can manage and control ThingMagic embedded modules and finished readers to implement an RFID solution.”

Using a smartphone or tablet with an RFID reader attached as a sled, dongle or connected via Bluetooth offers an attractive solution to developers and users compared to costly handheld computers. The value in opening up the development possibilities clears the way for more applications and supports the trend toward enabling a true Internet of Things. The Mercury API software development kit is a blanket offering for customers of all ThingMagic fixed and embedded readers. In addition, its inclusion with products such as the Mercury xPRESS flexible development platform offers a more comprehensive approach to delivering RFID solutions to a wider variety of vertical markets. Having more development options can enable new projects in retail, medical, manufacturing, logistics and transportation, among other markets that have made limited use of RFID.

The ThingMagic Mercury API removes complexities and speeds time to deployment for system integrators and OEMs developing solutions with ThingMagic readers and embedded modules, who will now benefit from support of a greater breadth of operating systems. Intuitively designed and supported by a significant volume of documentation, the Mercury API requires little RFID expertise and enables developers to rapidly design and test:

  —Reader and tag commands

  —Advanced read functionality such as setting antennas, protocols and
    filtering criteria

  —Advanced tag operations such as killing and locking tags

  —Privacy and security features

  —Performance and memory optimization

Mercury API version 1.23 is available now. Enhancements to the API enable an easy “out-of-the-box” solution for developers with the inclusion of a sample iOS application. Existing ThingMagic customers with a current support contract can download the API from the support portal on the ThingMagic Website.



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