WMS: Trends in warehouse management software

The mature technology has evolved with enhanced functionality, better integration and new methods of delivery and use. Here are the five trends driving the evolution of WMS.
image
By Sara Pearson Specter, Editor at Large
July 21, 2010 - MMH Editorial

Since it’s such an established technology, you may be thinking that there’s absolutely nothing new going on in the warehouse management systems (WMS) space. Well, you’d be wrong. Although the developments haven’t been as dramatic as they were 10 years ago, much progress has been made to enhance operations and reduce cost of ownership—and more warehouse/DC managers are beginning to make the move to upgrade.

“The WMS market is going through a metamorphosis,” says Steve Simmerman, director of business development for Next View Software (714-881-5105). “Users have systems that are eight-plus years old and too expensive to maintain and upgrade, too difficult to configure, and have outdated functionality. The solutions have matured, and that’s why we’re seeing more replacements.”

While the changes have been more evolutionary than revolutionary, they range from enhanced functionality and better integration with other supply chain systems to new modes of delivery and use. Here’s a deeper look at the top five trends that are the driving the evolution of WMS.



About the Author

image
Sara Pearson Specter
Editor at Large

Sara Pearson Specter has written articles and supplements for Modern Materials Handling and Material Handling Product News as an Editor at Large since 2001. Specter has worked in the fields of graphic design, advertising, marketing, and public relations for nearly 20 years, with a special emphasis on helping business-to-business industrial and manufacturing companies. She owns her own marketing communications firm, Sara Specter, Marketing Mercenary LLC (http://www.saraspecter.com). Clients include companies in a diverse range of fields, including materials handing equipment, systems and packaging, professional and financial services, regional economic development and higher education. Specter graduated from Centre College in Danville, Ky. with a bachelor’s degree in French and history. She lives in Oregon’s Willamette Valley where she and her husband are in the process of establishing a vineyard and winery (http://www.BellsUpWinery.com).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

As was the case for the second quarter, third quarter earnings results for publicly-traded less-than-truckload (LTL) carriers are again strong. Signs of solid earnings results from carriers that have posted earnings to date include tonnage increases, gains in weight per shipment and average daily shipments, higher yield, and revenue per hundredweight.

While the holiday season is known to bring good tidings and cheer to all, it may also come with another thing that is not so pleasant: higher rate freights. That was the thesis of a commentary written by Mark Montague, industry pricing analyst and chief market-watcher for DAT, a Portland, Ore.-based subsidiary of TransCore.

Earlier this week, FedEx said it is expanding its International First service for early deliveries with the addition of 31 new origin countries, which will bring the total number of origin markets for the service to 97.

Monday, December 22 is pegged as UPS's peak delivery day, as the company expects to deliver more than 34 million packages that day, adding that it expects to see six days in December top last year’s peak shipment day delivery record of 31 million packages.

The time has come again for less-than-truckload (LTL) general rate increases (GRI), with various carriers recently announced their respective rate hikes in recent days.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.