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Amazon.com to acquire Kiva Systems

Amazon.com Inc. has announced that it has reached an agreement to acquire Kiva Systems, a developer of mobile-robotic solutions that automate eCommerce order fulfillment and warehouse operations, for $775 million.
By Staff
March 20, 2012

Amazon.com, Inc. has announced that it has reached an agreement to acquire Kiva Systems, a developer of mobile-robotic solutions that automate eCommerce order fulfillment and warehouse operations.

“Amazon has long used automation in its fulfillment centers, and Kiva’s technology is another way to improve productivity by bringing the products directly to employees to pick, pack and stow,” said Dave Clark, vice president of global customer fulfillment for Amazon.com. “Kiva shares our passion for invention, and we look forward to supporting their continued growth.”

“For the past 10 years, the Kiva team has been focused on creating innovative material handling technologies,” said Mick Mountz, CEO and founder of Kiva Systems in a statement. “I’m delighted that Amazon is supporting our growth so that we can provide even more valuable solutions in the coming years.”

Following the acquisition, Kiva Systems’ headquarters will remain in North Reading, Mass.

Under the terms of the agreement, which has been approved by Kiva’s stockholders, Amazon will acquire all of the outstanding shares of Kiva for approximately $775 million in cash, as adjusted for the assumption of options and other items. Subject to various closing conditions, the acquisition is expected to close in the second quarter of 2012.

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