Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


IWLA calls pending California legislation a “job killer”

The bill under consideration in the state assembly, called AB 950 - Perez and Swanson, would mandate that only one form of labor – employee drivers – may transport truck shipments into and out of the ports of California.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
June 09, 2011

Proposed legislation in California that would make that state’s ports less competitive with other Pacific Rim and Gulf ports is being opposed by The International Warehouse Logistics Association (IWLA).

The bill under consideration in the state assembly, called AB 950 - Perez and Swanson, would mandate that only one form of labor – employee drivers – may transport truck shipments into and out of the ports of California.

The legislation would ban self-employed small business owners from trucking containers into and out of the California ports.?Currently, the Port of Long Beach is using a “hybrid” model, which permits free market truckers to compete for drayage against organized drivers. In all cases, however, the port mandates that cleaner fuel burning vehicles be used.

The Port of Los Angeles, meanwhile, continues to campaign for employee drivers. The Port of Oakland, too, appears to be headed for a similar program pending the outcome of current litigation.

“Should California enact this legislation, it will have the only ports in the United States that mandate that truck owner-operators cannot participate in the movement of freight,” said IWLA president and CEO Joel D. Anderson.

“Much of California’s tax revenues and wealth creation come from international trade and commerce that streams through its ports. While the rest of the nation competes for these jobs, this bill would take the opposite approach by being openly hostile to new jobs and trade activity.”

Zepol Corporation, a leading trade data and market intelligence company specializing in ocean cargo data, said that freight is already flowing away from California ports due to expenses related to this and other “green” issues.

“Long Beach and Los Angeles lost a combined 4 percent and 14 percent, respectively last year,” said Zepol’s president, Paul Rasmussen. “East Coast ports are picking up this traffic. New York/New Jersey and Houston were the biggest winners on the container front in the past two years.”

For related articles click here.

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Panjiva, an online search engine with detailed information on global suppliers and manufacturers, recently said it is opening up the “vault,” so to speak. The vault in this case is making its copious amount of trade data accessible through an Application Programming Interface (API), which enables customers to extract Panjiva’s trade data into their own database.

Freight transportation and logistics services provider Averitt Express recently announced it has rolled out improved transit times for less-than-truckload (LTL) service from the Midwest to Toronto and other cities.

Data issued by the National Retail Federation lowered its 2014 retail sales forecast, due to a slow first six months of the year (and largely negatively influenced by the terrible winter weather), but noted that retail sales are expected to be strong over the next five months to finish the year.

Anne Ferro, a ferocious advocate for greater truck safety and a constant thorn to truck drivers and some unsafe trucking fleets, says she is leaving as administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. No successor has been immediately named.

Data issued by the National Retail Federation lowered its 2014 retail sales forecast, due to a slow first six months of the year (and largely negatively influenced by the terrible winter weather), but noted that retail sales are expected to be strong over the next five months to finish the year.

Article Topics

News · Ocean Freight · Ocean Cargo · World Trade · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA