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WDC: LIft trucks get smarter

New technologies and usage practices can help you maximize your fleet’s productivity and longevity while reducing your carbon footprint.
By Sara Pearson Spector, Contributing Editor
October 08, 2010

Regardless of the style, lift truck suppliers are developing technologies that drive productivity improvements for users. With emissions control regulations and an increasing desire among users to be more environmental and cost-conscious about energy use, a number of trends have surfaced in the industry.

“Suppliers are looking at technology to improve productivity,” says Jeff Bowles, product marketing manager for Mitsubishi Caterpillar Forklift America, manufacturer, marketer, and distributor of CAT, Mitsubishi, and Jungheinrich lift truck brands. “Typical truck and warehouse designs, as well as regulations, can limit things like maximum truck speed, for example. So the trucks have to become smarter to become more productive.”

Developments include increased use of AC and alternative power sources, green technologies, better monitoring of fleets, and outsourced maintenance. If you’re ready to make a move on a new fleet or upgrade what you currently have, here are five of the hottest trends that you need to take into consideration.

Check out the related articles below.

Lift trucks: Solving the financial puzzle

Modern Material Handling Lift Truck & Fork Lift Critical Topics page

Warehouse/DC Equipment & Technology: Materials Handling Trends and Future Spending Plans

 

About the Author

Sara Pearson Spector
Contributing Editor

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