Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!

Port of Los Angeles makes significant improvements for drayage

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
January 27, 2014

In the coming weeks, the Port of Los Angeles will start construction on two major roadway projects that will improve the Harbor I-110 Freeway and nearby surface streets in San Pedro and Wilmington. The work, due to begin in February and extend through fall 2016, will make the Harbor Area safer and easier for cargo drayage vehicles to navigate.

Port spokesman, Phillip Sanfield told Logistics Management that these two road projects, representing more than $100 million in infrastructure investments, will help their “logistics chain partners” move their products faster, more efficiently and safer.

“We will continue to invest approximately $1.2 billion over the next five years in all aspects of our infrastructure so that we remain the premier trade gateway in North America,” he adds.

The Port is investing $46.6 million to widen the westbound transition from the SR-47 to the northbound I-110 and reconfigure the I-110/C Street interchange. The two projects will improve key segments of the freeway that link the nation’s No. 1 container port to downtown Los Angeles and are part of Southern California’s larger Regional Transportation Improvement Plan for a six-county area.

“These are significant public works projects that will improve the flow of traffic for thousands of commuters and truck drivers who use these roadways every day,” says Gary Lee Moore, Interim Executive Director of the Port of Los Angeles. “The I-110/C Street project will also help separate car and truck traffic near the port, making the drive safer and more manageable for everyone who lives and works in the harbor district.”

The Port’s contribution represents about half the $101 million cost of both projects. The Port is the lead agency working in partnership with two sister city agencies – the Department of Water and Power and the Department of Public Works Bureau of Engineering. The Port is also partnering with the California Department of Transportation and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro).

About the Author

Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Kurt Nagle, president and CEO of the American Association of Port Authorities recently voiced his endorsement of this trade legislation

While many auto executives expect more industry recalls in 2015 and 2016, just 8 percent use advanced predictive analytics to help prevent, prepare for, and manage recalls, according to a recent online poll from Deloitte.

Purolator white paper highlights common Canadian shipping mistakes. From failing to appreciate the complexity of the customs clearance process to not realizing that Canada recognizes both French and English as its official languages, U.S. businesses frequently misjudge the complexity of shipping to the Canadian market. This often results in mistakes - mistakes that can come with hefty penalties and border clearance delays, and that can result in lingering negative perceptions among Canadian consumers.

At a certain point, it seems like the ongoing truck driver shortage cannot get any worse, right? Well, think again, because of myriad reasons we could well be in the very early innings of a game that is, and continues, to be hard to watch. That was made clear in a report issued by the American Trucking Associations (ATA), entitled “Truck Driver Analysis 2015.”

Coming off of 2014, which in many ways is viewed as a banner year for freight, it appears that some tailwinds have firmly kicked in, as 2015 enters its official homestretch, according to Rosalyn Wilson, senior business analyst at Parsons, and author of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) Annual State of Logistics (SOL) Report at last week’s CSCMP Annual Conference in San Diego. The SOL report is sponsored by Penske Logistics.

Article Topics

News · Container · Logistics · Infrastructure · All topics


Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.

© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA